Journal

VOLUME IV, Fall 2013 | Law Journal for Social Justice

Editor’s Note:

The 2013 Law Journal for Social Justice Symposium, “Just/Justice: Valuing Fairness and Efficiency in the Criminal Justice System” brought together a collection of interdisciplinary scholars, attorneys and community members to discuss theoretical and practical concerns in the United States’ Criminal Justice system.  Discussions ranged from the ethics of attorneys within the system, theoretical concerns of criminal justice, mental health, and community support.  Panelists included scholars from Law, History, Justice Studies, Social Work, and Criminology, alongside practicing attorneys, judges and community organizers.

This issue echoes those discussions in a series of articles that analyze prosecutorial ethics, the provocation defense in cases with LGBTQ victims, the racialized effects of mass incarceration and resistance, and intimate partner violence in LGBTQ communities.  The first article, Testing the Death Penalty, comes from the “Just/Justice” keynote speaker, Paul Charlton, written with Quintin Cushner and William Knight, and sets the tone of this issue by presenting new ideas in thinking about the operation of the criminal justice system.  Each article analyzes a sector of criminal justice practice to raise important questions about fairness and efficiency in the criminal justice system.

Special thanks to the entire staff of the Law Journal for Social Justice, past and present, who helped to create this edition, particularly Executive Articles Editor Erin Iungerich, Executive Managing Editor Natali Segovia, Notes and Comments Editor Timothy Brody, and Former Editors Janette Corral, Jose Carrillo, Laura Clymer, and Michael Malin.

Jeremiah Chin
2013-2014 Editor-in-Chief, The Law Journal for Social Justice

Fall 2014 issue by article:

Testing the Death Penalty by Paul Charlton, Quintin Cushner and William H. Knight

Hyde-ing from the Truth: Does the Hyde Amendment Provide an Adequate Remedy for Known Prosecutorial Misconduct? by William H. Knight

Provocation Excuse: Using International Laws and Norms to Give Perspective in the Domestic Sphere by Erin Iungerich

Lockdown for Liberty: Black Masculinities, Mass Incarceration and Labor in the Georgia Prisoners Strike by Jeremiah Chin

LGBTQ Intimate Partner Violence in Phoenix by Justin Hoffman

 

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VOLUME III, Spring 2013 | Law Journal for Social Justice

Editors’ Note: This is the first time since our journal’s inception that we have produced consecutive issues in a single academic year. We want to thank our authors for their thoughtful approaches to the law and for examining how the law impacts underrepresented segments of our population — from immigrants to the elderly, from child porn victims to family pets: VOLUME III, Spring 2013 | Law Journal for Social Justice

Thanks to our dedicated LJSJ staff members, and in particular, Executive Managing Editor Tara Williams and Executive Articles Editors, Janette Corral and Jose Carrillo.

Lastly, be on lookout for our Symposium Issue this fall. It features articles from our “Just/Justice: Valuing Fairness and Efficiency in the Criminal Justice System” Symposium held March 1.

Laura Clymer and Michael Malin
2012-2013 Editors-in-Chief, The Law Journal for Social Justice

Spring 2013 issue by article:

Wrongs Against Immigrants’ Rights: Why Terminating the Parental Rights of Deported Immigrants Raises Constitutional and Human Rights Concerns by Rachel Zoghlin

Funding the Healing: Getting Victims Proper Restitution in Child Pornography Possession Cases by Julia Jarrett

Conflict in the Courts: The Federal Nursing Home Reform Amendment and § 1982 Causes of Action by Susan J. Kennedy

The Limits of Guilt and Shame and the Future of Affirmative Action by Donald L. Beschle

Closing the Loophole on the ‘Equal Opportunity/Bisexual’ Harasser Defense by Jose Carrillo

Why the ALI Should Redraft the Animal Cruelty Provision of the Model Penal Code by Nicole Pakiz

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VOLUME III, FALL 2012 | Legally Gay, The Symposium Issue

The 2012 Law Journal for Social Justice symposium, Legally Gay, brought together speakers from around the country in a discussion touching on the wide range of legal issues affecting the American LGBT community. The symposium itself included speakers from a diverse set of backgrounds, from the General Counsel of the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) to the director of outpatient services at a major Arizona hospital. In addition to law professors from around the country, the discussion included professors of Religious Studies, Justice & Social Inquiry, and Chicano/a Studies, and practicing lawyers from the fields of taxation, immigration, and estate planning. Similarly, the written product of the symposium features a diverse collection of topics and writers, making it a unique look at the legal and sociopolitical landscape for LGBT persons in America in 2012.

The greatest success of the symposium was its diversity of perspectives. The varied backgrounds of our speakers enriched the quality of the conversation, and we hope you’ll think the same thing of the written product: Volume III, Fall 2012 | Legally Gay, The Symposium Issue

Laura Clymer and Michael Malin
2012-2013 Editors-in-Chief, The Law Journal for Social Justice

Timothy Koch and Austin Gaylord
2011-2012 Editors-in-Chief, The Law Journal for Social Justice

Volume III, Fall 2012 Issue, by article:

Arguing About Families — Gay, Straight or Neither by Robert N. Minor

The Rhetoric of Same-Sex Relationships by Carrie Sperling

Public Schools as Workplaces: The Queer Gap Between “Workplace Equality” and “Safe Schools” by Madelaine Adelman and Catherine Lugg

One of These Things is Not Like the Other: An Analysis of Marriage Under the Immigration and Nationality Act by Regina M. Jefferies

Hate: An Examination and Defense of the Matthew Shepard & James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act by Jennifer Johnson

Marital Status and Sexual Orientation Discrimination in Infertility Care by Richard F. Storrow

Summer and Fall early releases:

“In Public Schools as Workplaces,” Adelman and Lugg call for an engagement between the market-based Workplace Equality Movement and the Safe Schools Movement to protect public school workers from anti-LGBT bias and discrimination. They write:

Public schools workers’ vulnerability to anti-LGBT bias and discrimination is not limited to direct surveillance of their identity or individual comportment, that is, who and how they are, but also indirectly based on what they are allowed to teach or discuss. This is because, in contrast to those who work in the business world, the public education workplace itself is a recognized battle site within the ongoing religious culture war.

Read the entire article: Public Schools as Workplaces: The Queer Gap Between “Workplace Equality” and “Safe Schools”

Professor Carrie Sperling examines how language choice can change the legal rights of same-sex couples. She writes:

In the civil rights context, our words heal, normalize, shift the debate, frame issues anew, and sometimes even cause disgust. Much of this happens outside our intentions and without our planning it, but it has profound effects on the legal rights we enjoy.

Read the entire article: The Rhetoric of Same-Sex Relationships by Carrie Sperling

Keynote speaker Dr. Robert N. Minor writes:

A lot of very bad arguments take place using the word “family.” By that, I mean they are based in falsehoods about the history and psychology of families. They are steeped in very creative, and current-position-affirming mythology, and void of what we historians call data. And they are found in every sphere, from religion to politics to law.
In fact, “family” is less a clear, established concept in popular discussion and more a multi-valent symbol akin to the American flag, the National Anthem, and apple pie. You can’t be against it, whatever it is, without losing elections, friends, and media attention.

Read the entire article: Arguing about Families – Gay, Straight or Neither by Robert N. Minor

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VOLUME II, FALL 2011

Law Journal for Social Justice, Fall 2011 Edition

By Article:

Testing the Boundaries of Humanitarian Relief from Removal: A Case Study of Claims by Mexican Law Enforcement Officers Targeted by Narcotraffickers by Kathryn A. Lohmeyer

Up from Colorblindness: Equality, Race, and the Lessons of Ricci v. DeStefano by Steven V. Mazie

Deferred Prosecution Agreements: Prosecutorial Balance in Times of Economic Meltdown by Sharon Oded

The Details of Discrimination by Zachary A. Kramer

Forging The Road Ahead: An Essay on Justice and Transformation in Legal Education by Rebecca Tsosie

The Cost of Denial: “Meds Yeghern” and the Quest for Restorative Justice for Descendants of Armenian Genocide Victims by Mykil Bachoian

Case Note: Criminal Law-Search and Seizure-Warrantless GPS Vehicle Tracking to Be Considered by the Supreme Court by Jack Escobar

Dream Act Still Just a Dream for Now: The Positive Effects of Creating a New Path to Lawful Status by Encouraging Military Enlistment and the Pursuit of Higher Education by Johnny Sinodis

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Volume I, Spring 2011

LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR SOME? A SYMPOSIUM ON RECENT ARIZONA LEGISLATION

By Article:

A Case Study of Color-Blind Rhetoric: The Racially Disparate Impacts of Arizona’s S.B. 100 and the Failure of Comprehensive Immigration Reform by Kevin R. Johnson

Arizona’s S.B. 1070: Separating Fact from Fiction by Carissa Byrne Hessick

We Want You When We Need You, Otherwise Get Out: The Historical Struggle of Mexican Immigrants to Obtain Lawful Permanent Residency in the U.S. by Evelyn Cruz & Sean Carpenter

Putting Finality in Perspective: Collateral Review of Criminal Judgments by Sigmund Popko

Comments on House Bill 2525 by Steve Twist

Keeping Citizenship Rights White: Arizona’s Racial Profiling Practices in Immigration Law Enforcement by Mary Romero

Innocent Until Interrogated by Gary Stuart, Reviewed by Larry Hammond

3 comments

  1. This is a request for support. Mentall ill persons are argubly the most marginalized population in the US today. Arizona has one of the shoddiest mental health care systems in the country, as mismanaged and thick neck deep in the dirty state gov. sy. as CPS etc, but the ones most reliant on its resources have no voice, for the most part. I was recently discharged from the AZ State Hospital in PHX, I spent 13 long months there undergoing “treatment” for major depressive disorder, this folliowing a suicide attempt. While at ASH, I witnessed and experienced first hand all sorts of really malfesant abuses of patient/human rights, admin. abuse of authority by clinicians and administraotrs alike, including reps of the Dept. of Health Servies office of grievance and appeals. It’s really, really bad, sub-standard mental health care to the nth degree. I just so happen to have finished two years of law school in reasonably good standing (UA 2001-2003), and as my depression subsided and my head cleared while at ASH, I began advocating on my own behalf (initially), only to find the whole process for redress so corrupt that it all back fired; the hospital engaged in systematic retaliation, intimidation, and the dept. ogf health and so on were complicit in all of it; it became a freaking free-for-all of unlawful administrative b.s. oriented towards suppressing my voice as a self advocate. In the next few months, I will be presenting numerous, well founded/documented allegations in administrative hearings (office of admin. hearings, downtown PHX), and the hospital and dept. will be defended by the state ag, probably a mealy mouthed little son of a bitch named Joel Rudd, who keeps an office at ASH and is one of the rudest inividuals I have ever had to share earth space with. I need help, and anything anyone can offer, at this point, will really help move things forward. I am trying to network for support. Please see my new blog: PJ Reed “Arizona State Hospital and Patient Abuse” on blogspot. I would love to become part of your own blog is if at all possilbe, or some such thing. But again, any help at all will be greatly appreciated. I sincerely hope to hear from you soon. Thanks, and keep up the good work.

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